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LED ZEPPELIN - When The Levee Breaks. The Making Of Led Zeppelin IV - Paperback Book

Frost was the first American who could be honestly reckoned a master-poet by world standards.??Robert Graves Robert Frost?s poetry has triumphantly survived him, but most readers today have not known him in one of his most significant capacities?as teacher and lecturer. Here, collected for the first time, are excerpts from forty-six of his presentations delivered to students at more than thirty academic institutions over three decades. Frost?s topics include: ?What I think I?m doing when I write a poem,? ?Getting up things to say for yourself,? ?The future of the world,? ?Fall in love at sight,? and ?Not freedom from, but freedom of.? Gathered by Edward Connery Lathem, editor ofThe Poetry of Robert Frost, and introduced by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David M. Shribman,Robert Frost: Speaking on Campus reveals Frost in the setting of both classroom and lecture hall, where he inspired thousands. 9 photosReviewStarred Review. The great some say greatest American poet was at one time so shy that he couldn t be induced to lecture or read in public at all. Yet in his later years, he became a frequent and extravagantly beloved speaker from whom wisdom about life and poetry flowed with conversational warmth and relaxation. In these excerpts from talks given to 'town-and-gown' audiences (college denizens and outsiders) during his last 13 years, he is golden.... at the heart of his message is the Socratic and Emersonian injunction to know oneself or, as he puts it in the very first talk here, 'getting up something to say for yourself.' --Ray Olson"Starred Review. The great-some say greatest-American poet was at one time so shy that he couldn't be induced to lecture or read in public at all. Yet in his later years, he became a frequent and extravagantly beloved speaker from whom wisdom about life and poetry flowed with conversational warmth and relaxation. In these excerpts from talks given to "town-and-gown" audiences (college denizens and outsiders) during his last 13 years, he is golden.... at the heart of his message is the Socratic and Emersonian injunction to know oneself or, as he puts it in the very first talk here, 'getting up something to say for yourself.' -- Ray OlsonAbout the AuthorRobert Frost, whose career spanned half a century, not only became America?s most widely read and cherished poet but also emerged as an immensely popular public figure. He won four Pulitzer Prizes.

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Frost was the first American who could be honestly reckoned a master-poet by world standards.??Robert Graves Robert Frost?s poetry has triumphantly survived him, but most readers today have not known him in one of his most significant capacities?as teacher and lecturer. Here, collected for the first time, are excerpts from forty-six of his presentations delivered to students at more than thirty academic institutions over three decades. Frost?s topics include: ?What I think I?m doing when I write a poem,? ?Getting up things to say for yourself,? ?The future of the world,? ?Fall in love at sight,? and ?Not freedom from, but freedom of.? Gathered by Edward Connery Lathem, editor ofThe Poetry of Robert Frost, and introduced by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David M. Shribman,Robert Frost: Speaking on Campus reveals Frost in the setting of both classroom and lecture hall, where he inspired thousands. 9 photosReviewStarred Review. The great some say greatest American poet was at one time so shy that he couldn t be induced to lecture or read in public at all. Yet in his later years, he became a frequent and extravagantly beloved speaker from whom wisdom about life and poetry flowed with conversational warmth and relaxation. In these excerpts from talks given to 'town-and-gown' audiences (college denizens and outsiders) during his last 13 years, he is golden.... at the heart of his message is the Socratic and Emersonian injunction to know oneself or, as he puts it in the very first talk here, 'getting up something to say for yourself.' --Ray Olson"Starred Review. The great-some say greatest-American poet was at one time so shy that he couldn't be induced to lecture or read in public at all. Yet in his later years, he became a frequent and extravagantly beloved speaker from whom wisdom about life and poetry flowed with conversational warmth and relaxation. In these excerpts from talks given to "town-and-gown" audiences (college denizens and outsiders) during his last 13 years, he is golden.... at the heart of his message is the Socratic and Emersonian injunction to know oneself or, as he puts it in the very first talk here, 'getting up something to say for yourself.' -- Ray OlsonAbout the AuthorRobert Frost, whose career spanned half a century, not only became America?s most widely read and cherished poet but also emerged as an immensely popular public figure. He won four Pulitzer Prizes.

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